Tamasha- Movie Review by Ram Anand

Why do they always end the fun part? But of course, the younger Ved constantly asked that question to his banyan tree ‘storyteller’ in this non-linear narrative. But that’s life. Fun ends. Insecurities start.

Sitting at a cafe library in Delhi, Tara (Deepika Padukone) is reading a book called Catch 22, eagerly hoping she would somehow bump into Ved (Ranbir Kapoor), the man whom she knew as Don from her short holiday in Corsica, France.

We all know what is eventually going to happen- there is no unpredictability here. This scene has been played a hundred times over, in a hundred movies over. The fun at Corsica just had to end, and they just had to make life difficult for themselves. But don’t we all?
images (1)
Then she catches a glimpse of him. The background music, which was silent, gives way to the final beats of “Heer to Badi Sad Hai”. We are treated with the grinning faces of Punjabi folks music performers, singing about Heer’s state of mind, as she runs down the stairs, runs back back up, and struggles to make up her mind on whether she should make herself visible to Ved. When she finally walks over and he says hi to her, overcome with excitement, she sits at a coffee table and does a small fist pump to herself. Now, this, you don’t see in a hundred movies over. It’s called treatment and characterisation. And in Tamasha, it’s as gorgeous as Deepika’s heart melting reactions- especially when she hesitates and says “Oh okay” when Ved tells her she has no boyfriend.
Of course, the mass populace will moan and gripe about the “boringness” of this second half, especially after a rollicking first hour in Corsica. Why do they always end the fun part? But of course, the younger Ved constantly asked that question to his banyan tree ‘storyteller’ in this non-linear narrative. But that’s life. Fun ends. Insecurities start.
But then, Ranbir Kapoor’s bravura performance takes over. The way he converses to the mirror, somewhat creepily, shows, the alter ego, the dual personality, that he has been hiding. And in more than one way, hints at how that common 9am-5pm man on the street, who does exactly the same things everyday, might have hidden a Don inside himself.
Ved and Don fight each other quintessentially in the second half- and Don can no longer take it. He is yearning to come out, and the more Ved restraints, the more damage Don causes to Ved’s sanity. This is not something new for an Imtiaz Ali movie, he started this paradigm of exploring the psychology of his protagonists intently with Rockstar. He followed that up a notch higher with Alia Bhatt fighting the demons of sexual abuse and Stockholm syndrome in Highway. In Tamasha, the canvas is larger, and the performance a masterpiece.
There will plenty of reviews to tell you how good the Corsica part was, but Tamasha can be best epitomised in that intense scene at a pub when Ved and Tara wrestle each other.
Ved is telling Tara he might hurt her as he is unsure of his own behaviour, while Tara, looking totally shattered, asks herself “what have I done?”- she had touched a raw nerve that had triggered his other personality.
As Ved finally succumbs to crying and admitting that Tara’s words had totally changed him, he turns away from her and lays his face on the table. She imitates him, and pats on him on the head. AR Rahman works his magic here with the best number of a sumptuous album- Tum Saath Ho.
And there is this line from Irshad Kamil, the lyricist- “There are dreams in your eyes, your dreams are full of disappointment, I feel whatever you may say- they are full of lies. What difference does it make- if you are with me or not? Life is cruel, and always be cruel”.
Fine poetry, legendary musical, aesthetic direction, and two wonderful talents competing with each other on their acting chops.
Yes, I will tell you Tamasha is entirely predictable- as predictable as the high you will get if you drink a bottle of wine all on your own.
The question is- do you enjoy the taste of fine wine? Does it make a difference whether it’s wine bottled in 2010 or one bottled 100 years ago?
If you have proper, delectable taste, Tamasha will bowl you over, and leave you moved.
And just think, how many of us are struggling to get out of the box liked Ved?
A beautiful movie made on a canvas of great emotions, this will linger on me for sometime, I can tell you that much.
Rating: 9/10

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *